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Thursday, 19 May 2011 16:05

Understanding IP Addressing

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On the Internet each device is assigned a unique IP address.

IP address consists of 32 bits, usually to display a 4-octet from decimal format instead of the binary digits of the form 0-255.
For example, IP address: 168.212.226.204 in binary form is 101,010,00.,110,101.. But we have to remember the number of decimal places, rather than a binary number, so we use a decimal number to represent the IP address, in describing them more easily.
However, the binary number is important, because this will determine the type of network the IP address belongs to. IP addresses are divided into two parts, a fixed network and node address, or host. Address class to determine which part of the network address and which part of the respective node address. All of the nodes on a given network share the same network prefix but must have a unique host number.

Class a network binary addresses start with 0, so a decimal number can be anywhere from 1 to 126. (The first octet) the first 8 bits identifies the network, and the remaining 24 bits indicate the host within the network. An example of a class a IP address Yes 102.168., "102" identifies the network and the "168.212.226" identifies the host on the network.
Class b network binary addresses start with 10, so a decimal number can be anywhere from 128 to 191. (127 reserved for loopback and used for internal testing on a local computer). The first 16 bits (two bytes) identifies the network and the remaining 16 bits indicate the host within the network. An example of a class b IP address 168.212.226.204 in the "168.212" identifies the network and "226.204" identifies the host on the network.
Class c network binary addresses start with 110, so a decimal number can be anywhere from 192 to 223. 24th (the first three octets) identify the network and the remaining 8 bits indicate the host within the network. An example of a class c IP address 200.168.212.226 in the "200.168.212" identifies the network and "226" identifies the host on the network.
Class d network binary addresses start--1110 years, so a decimal number can be anywhere between 224 and 239. D class methods that support multicast network.
Class e network binary addresses start--1111 years, so a decimal number can be anywhere from 240 to 255. Class e network used in experiments. They will never be recorded or been used.

 

 

Last modified on Tuesday, 12 February 2013 07:30
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